Monthly Archives: October 2015

Yosi Keller: Probabilistic approach to high order assignment problems

Yosi KellerYosi Keller received the BSc degree in Electrical Engineering in 1994 from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa. He received the MSc and PhD degrees in electrical engineering from Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, in 1998 and 2003, respectively. From 2003 to 2006 he was a Gibbs assistant professor with the Department of Mathematics, Yale University. He is an Associate Professor at the Faculty of Engineering in Bar Ilan University, Israel. His research relates to the applications of graph theory and machine learning to signal processing, computer vision and 3D modelling. His talk takes place on Thursday, November 26, 1pm in room E105.

Probabilistic approach to high order assignment problems

A gamut of computer vision and engineering problems can be cast as high order matching problems, where one considers the affinity/probability of two or more assignments simultaneously. The spectral matching approach of Leordeanu and Hebert (2005) was shown to provide an approximate solution of this np-hard problem. It this talk we present recent results on the probabilistic interpretation of spectral matching. We extend the results of Zass and Shashua (2008) and provide a probabilistic interpretation to the spectral matching and graduated assignment (1996) algorithms. We then derive a new probabilistic matching scheme, and show that it can be extended to high order matching scheme, via a dual marginalization-decomposition scheme. We will present a novel Integer Least Squares algorithm and apply it to the decoding of MIMO and OFDM channels, in the uncoded and coded cases, respectively. Joint work with Amir Egozi, Michael Chertok , Avi Septimus, Ayelet Haimovitch, Shimrit Haber and Dr. Itzik Bergel.

Michael Wimmer: Computer Graphics Meets Computational Design

MichaelWimmerMichael Wimmer is currently an Associate Professor at the Institute of Computer Graphics and Algorithms of the Vienna University of Technology, where he heads the Rendering Group. His academic career started with his M.Sc. in 1997 at the Vienna Universtiy of Technology, where he obtained his Ph.D. in 2001. His research interests are real-time rendering, computer games, real-time visualization of urban environments, point-based rendering, procedural modeling and shape modeling. He has coauthored over 100 papers in these fields. He also coauthored the book Real-Time Shadows. He served on many program committees, including ACM SIGGRAPH and SIGGRAPH Asia, Eurographics, Eurographics Symposium on Rendering, ACM I3D, etc. He is currently associate editor of Computers & Graphics and TVCG. He was papers co-chair of EGSR 2008, Pacific Graphics 2012, and Eurographics 2015. His talk takes place on Tuesday, October 20, 1 pm in room A112.

Computer Graphics Meets Computational Design

In this talk, I will report on recent advancements in Computer Graphics, which will be of great interest for next-generation computational design tools. I will present methods for modeling from images, modeling by examples and multiple examples, but also procedural modeling, modeling of physical behavior and light transport, all recently developed in our group. The common rationale behind our research is that we exploit real-time processing power and computer graphics algorithms to enable interactive computational design tools that allow short feedback loops in design processes.